• Anglais The Weir

    McPherson Conor

    The spellbinding, beautifully observed hit from the master of suspenseful realism; combining superbly chilling tales of the supernatural with the hilarious banter of a small community in the heart of rural Ireland. A bar in a remote part of Ireland. The local lads are swapping spooky stories to impress a young woman recently moved to the area from Dublin. As the drink flows and the stories become increasingly frightening, it's clear that Valerie has something on her mind. She has a tale to tell that'll stop them all dead in their tracks. Winner of: Olivier Award for Best New Play, Evening Standard Award for Best New Playwright, Critic's Circle Award for Most Promising New Playwright. 'The play of the decade... a modern masterpiece' Express 'Puts one in mind of an Irish Chekhov. I have rarely been so convinced that I have just seen a modern classic' Daily Telegraph

  • This volume of Conor McPherson's collected plays, covering a decade of writing, celebrates a fascination with the uncanny which has led him to be described as 'quite possibly the finest playwright of his generation' (New York Times). In Shining City, a man seeks help from a counsellor, claiming to have seen the ghost of his dead wife. The play, premiered at the Royal Court, London, is 'up there with The Weir, moving, compassionate, ingenious and absolutely gripping' (Daily Telegraph) The Seafarer, premiered at the National Theatre before going on to become a Tony Award-winning Broadway hit, tells the story of an extended Christmas Eve card game, but one played for the highest stakes possible. 'McPherson proves yet again he is both a born yarn-spinner and an acute analyst of the melancholy Irish manhood' (Guardian) Set in 'the big house' in 1820s rural Ireland, The Veil is McPherson's first period play. Seventeen-year-old Hannah is to be married off in order to settle the debts of the crumbling estate. But when Reverend Berkeley arrives, determined to orchestrate a séance, chaos is unleased. 'A cracking fireside tale of haunting and decay' (The Times) The Birds, hauntingly adapted from the short story by Daphne du Maurier, is 'deliciously chilling, claustrophobic, questioning, frightening; and with a twist' (Irish Independent). It is published here for the first time, as is The Dance of Death, a new version of Strindberg's classic, which premiered at the Trafalgar Studios in London. 'A spectacularly bleak yet curiously bracing drama that often makes you laugh out loud' (Daily Telegraph) Completing the volume is a Foreword by the author.

  • An inimitably warm and stylish play that deftly mines the humanity to be found in the most unlikely of situations. Tommy's not a bad man, he's getting by. Renting a run-down room in his uncle Maurice's house, just about keeping his ex-wife and kids at arm's length and rolling from one get-rich-quick scheme to the other with his pal Doc. Then one day he comes to the aid of Aimee, who's not had it easy herself, struggling through life the only way she knows how. Their past won't let go easily. But together there's a glimmer of hope they could make something more of their lives. Something extraordinary. Perhaps. The Night Alive premiered at the Donmar Warehouse, London in June 2013, directed by Conor McPherson.

  • A suspenseful, atmospheric adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's enthralling short story. Mysterious masses of birds have begun to violently attack at high tide, driving strangers Nat and Diane to take refuge in an isolated, abandoned house by the sea and form a bond to survive their haunting new circumstance. With no electricity and scarce food, the tension is palpable and hope is waning. Yet if two is company, three is a crowd, as the sudden arrival of a young woman with a mysterious nature of her own ruffles feathers in the house and quickly threatens to destroy their so-called sanctuary. Conor McPherson's adaptation of The Birds premiered at the Gate Theatre, Dublin in September 2009. 'deliciously chilling... spring-loaded with tension' Irish Independent 'McPherson keeps us on the edge of our seat' Irish Times

  • A brilliant, haunting play from the multi-award winning author of The Weir. Ian has left the priesthood to become a therapist. John is one of his first clients. John's wife has been killed in a car accident, and he keeps receiving visits from her ghost. John, with Ian's help, starts to recover. But what begins as an unusual encounter becomes a desperate struggle between the living and the dead – a struggle which will shape and define both of them for the rest of their lives. Shining City premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in June 2004. 'moving, compassionate, ingenious and absolutely gripping ... scenes that provoke great, generous gales of laughter, others that send a shiver of fear down the spine ... riveting' Telegraph 'quiet, haunting and absolutely glorious... as close to perfection as contemporary playwriting gets' New York Times 'compulsively gripping... McPherson brilliantly reconciles the mundane and the metaphysical' Guardian

  • A visceral new version of Strindberg's compelling, bitingly funny battle of wills. On an isolated island, military captain Edgar and his wife Alice live a bitter life, their marriage soured by hatred. When the possibility of redemption and escape arrives for Alice in the shape of their former comrade Kurt, it seems that Edgar is prepared to use his very last breath to make their lives a living hell. Conor McPherson's version of The Dance of Death premiered at Trafalgar Studios, London in December 2012. 'it's impossible to look away' Time Out 'a grotesque comedy that anticipates the work of theatrical absurdists such as Beckett and Ionesco... a profoundly seminal work' Guardian 'shockingly funny... its raw savagery is thrilling and its bleak existential despair almost Beckettian' The Times

  • Set around a haunted house hemmed in by a restive, starving populace, The Veil weaves Ireland's troubled colonial history into a transfixing story about the search for love, the transcendental and the circularity of time. May 1822, rural Ireland. The defrocked Reverend Berkeley arrives at the crumbling former glory of Mount Prospect House to accompany seventeen year-old Hannah to England. She is to be married off to a marquis in order to resolve the debts of her mother's estate. However, compelled by the strange voices that haunt his beautiful young charge and a fascination with the psychic current that pervades the house, Berkeley proposes a seance, the consequences of which are catastrophic. 'an atmospheric and haunting tale of lost souls' - Evening Standard 'bold and intriguing... McPherson keeps you guessing to the last' - Financial Times

  • A breathtaking supernatural play from the author of The Weir. It's Christmas Eve and Sharky has returned to Dublin to look after his irascible, ageing brother who's recently gone blind. Old drinking buddies Ivan and Nicky are holed up at the house too, hoping to play some cards. But with the arrival of a stranger from the distant past, the stakes are raised ever higher. In fact, Sharky may be playing for his very soul. 'a blistering emotional punch... The Seafarer first ambushes you and then haunts you for days afterwards' - Time Out 'sparkling and suspenseful... McPherson is a born yarn-spinner' - Guardian 'McPherson's new play is one of his most succinct and startling, and the funniest to date... what he creates is apparently simple, but daring and memorable. He sends his characters off on benders, and they bump into the infinite' - Observer 'a realistic fantasy, a wide-awake nightmare. The writing is poetic, brutal, athletic, hilarious' - Sunday Times

  • The second collection of plays from the multi-award winning author. Featuring: The Weir
    A magical, compelling play set in present day Dublin on Christmas Eve. Undertaker John Plunkett is sharing memories of funerals over the years and dispensing advice to his young assistant. But the arrival of his daughter Mary – estranged, grown-up – shows him the time has come to face up to his own disastrous past. Otherwise, he will never be able to create some kind of truce with his fear of the future. Dublin Carol
    The spellbinding, beautifully observed hit from the master of suspenseful realism; combining superbly chilling tales of the supernatural with the hilarious banter of a small community in the heart of rural Ireland.Olivier Award for Best New Play
    Evening Standard Award for Best New Playwright
    Critic's Circle Award for Most Promising New Playwright Port Authority
    A wry, moving, funny tale of how modern man faces up to the responsibility of love, woven in monologues. Come On Over
    A short play about a Jesuit priest, sent to investigate a 'miracle' in his home town, who re-encounters the woman who loved him thirty years before. The collection also features an Afterword and in-depth interview with the author. 'already heir to the great Irish tradition of absorbing tale-telling' - Guardian 'The finest dramatist of his generation' - Telegraph

  • Four plays from the author of The Weir, with a foreword by the author. The plays in this volume – three monologues and a three-hander – were all written while Conor McPherson was in his twenties. This Lime Tree Bower
    A poignant and gripping tale told through three interlinking monologues. Winner of a Thames TV Award, a Guinness/National Theatre Ingenuity Award and the Meyer Whitworth Award. St Nicholas
    An eccentric, teasing yarn involving a cynical and jaded drama critic falling for a beautiful young actress. Rum and Vodka
    A young Irishman with a drink problem tells of three momentous days in his life when his drab nine-to-five existence is obliterated in an escapist binge which threatens to engulf him. The Good Thief
    A 45-minute monologue following the misfortunes of a petty criminal whose conscience beats him up when he becomes involved in a bungled kidnap. Winner of the Stewart Parker Award. Revised edition with new Foreword by the author. ‘the finest playwright of his generation' - New York Times

  • A short play from the author of The Weir. A Jesuit priest, sent to investigate a 'miracle' in his home town, re-encounters the woman who loved him thirty years before.

  • A 45-minute monologue from the multi-award winning author of The Weir. Winner of the Stewart Parker Award. Following the misfortunes of a petty criminal whose conscience beats him up when he becomes involved in a bungled kidnap. 'the writing is terse, lucid and admirably dispassionate' - Irish Times

  • An eccentric, teasing yarn of a play from the multi-award winning author of The Weir. A cynical and jaded drama critic falls for a beautiful young actress. In pursuing her, he meets a group of modern-day vampires who offer him eternal life – his part of the bargain is to feed their bloodlust. 'a delectably droll celebration of storytelling as striptease. McPherson's ear for detail is devastating' New York Times

  • A play from the multi-award winning author of The Weir. A young Irishman with a drink problem tells of three momentous days in his life when his drab nine-to-five existence is obliterated in an escapist binge which threatens to engulf him.

  • A poignant and gripping tale told through three interlinking monologues from the multi-award winning author of The Weir. Three young men from a small seaside town near Dublin tell us in overlapping monologues of their inextricably linked lives and the eventful week which was to change things for good... Winner of a Thames TV Award, a Guinness/National Theatre Ingenuity Award and the Meyer Whitworth Award. 'A touching, marvellously entertaining play which tells a gripping tale with assured panache. This is a piece of real richness' - Daily Telegraph

  • A wry, moving, funny play of how modern man faces up to the responsibility of love, woven in monologues, from the multi-award winning author of The Weir. A boy leaves home for the first time. A man starts a job for which he is not qualified. A pensioner has just been sent a mysterious package. Away from bar-room bravado, three men show us the reality of big dreams and missed chances, of loves lost and trouble found, of the messiness of life and the quirkiness of fate. 'Totally absorbing, often hilarious and, at times, heart-wrenchingly moving... An act of pure theatre' - Irish Times 'A work by a major writer... His sentences are better, his sentiments more developed and shaded than many Booker Prize-winners. He is terrific.' - Observer

  • A magical, compelling play from the author of The Weir. Present day Dublin. Christmas Eve. Undertaker John Plunkett is sharing memories of funerals over the years and dispensing advice to his young assistant. But the arrival of his daughter Mary – estranged, grown-up – shows him the time has come to face up to his own disastrous past. Otherwise, he will never be able to create some kind of truce with his fear of the future. 'a theatrical spellbinder' - Daily Telegraph 'McPherson's short play is excellent: tough on love and the causes of love; profoundly sympathetic and damning about the denizens of the drunk tank.' - Time Out

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