Crown/Archetype

  • The explosive secret e-mails Hillary Clinton doesn’t want you to read
    (Or maybe she does…She’s crafty like that.)
    Remember that time Hillary Clinton admitted that she deleted thousands of e-mails from her ultra-secret personal e-mail address while Secretary of State? Thousands of e-mails, she claimed, about her daughter’s wedding? Well, people aren’t buying it: “Hiding the truth” says The New York Post. “Conspiracy or incompetence?” asks Al-Jazeera. “Hillary Clinton Don’t Give a Sh*t” claims Wonkette. Clearly, these e-mails need to be released immediately.
    Now, thanks to John Moe and WikiLoox, the lost messages have been retrieved and placed in this dossier. For the first time, we’ll get a look inside HRC’s well-coiffed head, reading intimate conversations with family (Bill, Chelsea), friends (Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Oprah, Beyonce), and frenemies (Obama, Palin, Putin) alike. We’ll also learn essential details about her private life, from her pop-culture obsessions to her thoughts on yoga, baking cookies, "Scandal," and much more.
    Make no mistake--this is a book of critical national importance. Following her journey from mother-of-the-bride to commandress-in-chief, we’ll see how HRC handles the most challenging situations she might face in the White House, including how to respond to people who "reply all" to e-mails and how to wrangle pantsuit retailers as they compete, with increasing desperation, for her attention. Along the way, we will finally get the portrait we need--the one our country deserves--of the woman we may soon call "Madam President."
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • The slyly funny, sweetly moving memoir of an unconventional dad’s relationship with his equally offbeat son--complete with fast cars, tall tales, homemade explosives, and a whole lot of fun and trouble
    John Robison was not your typical dad. Diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome at the age of forty, he approached fatherhood as a series of logic puzzles and practical jokes. Instead of a speech about the birds and the bees, he told his son, Cubby, that he'd bought him at the Kid Store--and that the salesman had cheated him by promising Cubby would “do all chores.” While other parents played catch with their kids, John taught Cubby to drive the family's antique Rolls-Royce. Still, Cubby seemed to be turning out pretty well, at least until school authorities decided that he was dumb and stubborn--the very same thing John had been told as a child. Did Cubby have Asperger’s too? The answer was unclear.
    One thing was clear, though: By the time he turned seventeen, Cubby had become a brilliant and curious chemist--smart enough to make military-grade explosives and bring federal agents calling. With Cubby facing a felony trial--and up to sixty years in prison--both father and son were forced to take stock of their lives, finally accepting that being “on the spectrum” is both a challenge and a unique gift.

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